Bees on Calliandra Flower

Bees on Calliandra Flower

Bees on Calliandra Flower
Copyright © 2014 Will Chen.

Two bees busy at work collecting pollen from a Calliandra flower at Busch Gardens, Tampa, Florida.  Photo taken on July 26, 2014 before a summer thunderstorm rolled in.  This striking flower is one of my favorite flowers at Busch Gardens.

Calliandra is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae, subfamily Mimosoideae. It contains about 140 species that are native to tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas.

 

The genus comprises herbaceous perennial plants, shrubs and rarely small trees growing 0.5–6 m tall, with bipinnate leaves. The flowers are produced in cylindrical or globose inflorescences and have numerous long slenderstamens which give rise to the common names powder-puff, powder puff plant, and fairy duster. These plants flower all year round, but the best blooming is in spring and summer. They can be easily pruned.

 

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calliandra

 

Honey bees (or honeybees) are bees of the genus Apis, primarily distinguished by the production and storage of honey and the construction of perennial, colonial nests from wax. Honey bees are the only extant members of the tribe Apini, all in the genus Apis. Currently, only seven species of honey bee are recognized, with a total of 44 subspecies, though historically, from six to 11 species have been recognised. Honey bees represent only a small fraction of the roughly 20,000 known species of bees. Some other types of related bees produce and store honey, but only members of the genus Apis are true honey bees. The study of honey bees is known as apiology.

 

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_bee