St. Augustine Lighthouse Stairs

St. Augustine Lighthouse Stairs

St. Augustine Lighthouse Stairs
Copyright © 2014 Will Chen.

Shot of the stairs climbing up the St. Augustine Lighthouse.  I got quite a workout that day.  Surprisingly, my son had to meet a height requirement to climb the lighthouse.  Sorry kid, maybe on the next visit.  The view at the top overlooking the area was spectacular.  I talked to the lighthouse keeper and he pointed that nearby waters are filled with sunken ships.  There are ongoing archeological dives into the nearby Atlantic waters to recover treasures and other historical artifacts.  This photo was taken during our 4th of July weekend excursion to the Atlantic coast of Florida.

The St. Augustine Light is an active lighthouse in St. Augustine, Florida. The current lighthouse stands at the north end of Anastasia Island and was built in 1874; it is the most recent of a number of towers built in the area. The tower is owned by the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Museum, Inc. (SAL&M), a not-for-profit maritime museum and private aid-to-navigation. Open to the public, admission fees support continued preservation of the Lighthouse and fund programs in maritime archaeology and education.

 

St. Augustine was the site of the first lighthouse established in Florida by the new, territorial, American Government in 1824. According to some archival records and maps, this “official” American lighthouse was placed on the site of an earlier watchtower built by the Spanish as early as the late 16th century.[2] A map of St. Augustine made by Baptista Boazio in 1589, depicting Sir Francis Drake’s attack on the city, shows an early wooden watch tower near the Spanish structure, which was described as a “beacon” in Drake’s account. By 1737, Spanish authorities built a more permanent tower from coquina taken from a nearby quarry on the island. Archival records are inconclusive as to whether the Spanish used the coquina tower as a lighthouse, but it seems likely, given the levels of maritime trade by that time. The structure was regularly referred to as a “lighthouse” in documents dating to the British Period beginning in 1763.

 

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Augustine_Light