Buddhist Monk in Japan

Buddhist Monk in Japan

Buddhist Monk in Japan
Copyright © 2016 Will Chen.

Saichō petitioned for a Mahayana ordination platform to be built in Japan. Permission was granted seven days after his death and the platform was completed in 827 by his disciple, Gishin.

Saichō believed the 250 precepts were for the Śrāvakayāna and that ordination should use the Mahayana precepts of the Brahmajala Sutra. He stipulated that monastics remain on Mount Hiei for twelve years of isolated training and follow the major themes of the 250 precepts: celibacy, non-harming, no intoxicants, vegetarian eating and reducing labor for gain. After twelve years, monastics would then use the Vinaya precepts as a provisional, or supplemental, guideline to conduct themselves by when serving in non-monastic communities.  Tendai monastics followed this practice.

During Japan’s Meiji Restoration during the 1870s, the government abolished celibacy and vegetarianism for Buddhist monastics in an effort to secularise them and promote the newly-created State Shinto.[14][15]Japanese Buddhists won the right to proselytize inside cities, ending a five-hundred year ban on clergy members entering cities.

After the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910, when Japan annexed Korea, Korean Buddhism underwent many changes. Jōdo Shinshū and Nichiren schools began sending missionaries to Korea under Japanese rule, and new sects formed there such as Won Buddhism. The Temple Ordinance of 1911 (Hangul사찰령; hanja寺刹令) changed the traditional system whereby temples were run as a collective enterprise by the Sangha, replacing this system with Japanese-style management practices in which temple abbots appointed by theGovernor-General of Korea were given private ownership of temple property and given the rights of inheritance to such property.  More importantly, monks from pro-Japanese factions began to adopt Japanese practices, by marrying and having children.

Currently, priests (lay religious leaders) in Japan choose to observe vows as appropriate to their family situation. Celibacy and other forms of abstaining are generally “at will” for varying periods of time.

In Korea, the practice of celibacy varies. The two sects of Korean Seon divided in 1970 over this issue; the Jogye Order is fully celibate while the Taego Order has both celibate monastics and non-celibate Japanese-style priests.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhikkhu